Multiple-choice questions dominate the formats of questions asked

Having examined more than 100 reports published by law firms based on the surveys they sponsored, I suspected that more than three out of four questions asked on the surveys fell into the category of multiple choice. Reluctant to confirm that sense by laboriously trying to categorize all the questions in all those surveys, I invited my trusty R software select five of the surveys at random.

Sure enough, all five not only exceeded the perception of at least 75% of the questions being multiple choice, but in fact every single question that could be identified from the five reports fell into that format! Bear in mind that we can’t be certain about all the questions asked on the surveys, but we can glean from the reports most of them. It would be necessary to count from the actual questionnaire to confirm this data.

Specifically, Seyfarth Shaw Future 2017 went eight for eight, Morrison Foerster MA 2014 was five out of five, and Berwin Leighton Arbvenue 2014 used multiple-choice questions for all of its at least 14 questions (it is difficult to figure out from the Berwin report exactly how many questions were on the survey). In Foley Lardner Telemedicine 2014, all twelve questions (include three demographic questions) were multiple choice; with Foley Lardner Cars 2017, all 16 questions were multiple choice (including two demographic questions).

Of those 55 multiple choice questions, a few presented binary choices but most of them presented a list of 4-to-7 selections to pick from. Likert scales appeared rarely, as illustrated in the plot below from Foley Lardner Cars 2017 [pg. 5]. The scale ranges from “Strongly Agree” to “Strongly Disagree.”

Morrison Foerster MA 2014 [pg. 4] also used a Likert scale in a question.

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